Agility and Footwork


TacArnis streamlines training by using ‘Instructional Alignment’ built on a concept training approach… which is fancy teacher talk that simply means:  We use the same basic ideas/theories (Concepts) to teach different skills and abilities.  The major advantage is the speed for the learner.

  1. New material can be learned more quickly because the format of instruction is familiar from prior lessons.
  2. Movements/patterns are built ‘into the bones’ of students quickly for application under stress.
  3. Concepts/tactics grow beyond ‘techniques’ because students apply the same movements under a different stressors/situations.
  4. Students will be ‘faster’ because they can adapt the same patterns of movement to fit situations instead of the ‘if the attacker is doing this, you respond with that…’ approach (which slows down the OODA loop process considerably).
As a student and a teacher I stress ambidexterity in training as well, so notice that I move the patterns with both left and right leads as well as using both my left and right hand w/ the stick.
This vid was shot after about 70 burpee combos with stick strikes, focus mitt drills, and pistol draws, so ‘when’ you include this type of training into a class can add a challenge factor as well.  This was like trying to rub my stomach and pat my head while tap dancing – but it still beats a day on the treadmill as far as I’m concerned.
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TAWG Workout Rewind 5/5/11˝


This week we were ‘cutting angles.’

In TacArnis, as in many FMA based systems, moving on angles instead of straight into or away from the bad guy is a big part of training.  We use a drill called “De Cadena” which loosely translates to “Chain” because we ‘link’ with our partner through a continuous flow of trapping hand feed/response.

Training Objectives/Outcomes:

  • Using good footwork/mobility to ‘cut the angle’ by moving on the “X”
    • Move ‘straight’ past the ‘bad guy’ on the angle.
      • Get into his blindspot
      • close to counter attack range quickly
      • move out of his ideal striking range by closing
  • Avoid the ‘side to side’ sweeping footwork habit.
      • It’s a lazy habit that makes the drill easier to do.
      • It keeps you in front of the bad guy.
      • You stay in his line of sight
      • the ‘sweep’ pattern eats time.

T.A.W.G. 3/22 workout fun as usual


Thanks to Tom, Dale, Sabrina, Dianna, Rick, Tony, and Alex of another fun one.

Training Objectives/Outcomes:

  • Footwork vs. “Stance”
  • Tactical Arnis is a high mobility system
  • Controlling your movement while disrupting the bad guy’s
  • Intro to the T.A.W.G. footwork patterns.

The difference between training ‘footwork’ and training ‘stance’ is difficult to grasp for some, but the great thing was to watch Sabrina and Dianna (very new students) working through the confusion.  It was just as interesting to watch some of the more experienced students making connections and sharing their lightbulb moments.

Next week: Scenario games!

T.A.W.G. 3/15 workout a blast again


Thanks to Dan, Dale, Michele, Sabrina, Tom, Tony, Dianne, and Alex for another good workout.

Training Objectives/Outcomes:

  • Highlight circular movements (Single Siniwali concept and application, Downward figure 8 stick strikes, bob/weaving)
  • Reinforce the importance of relaxed/soft motion with circular movement.  It’s about redirection/guiding.
  • See the linear vs. circular relationship for the ‘bigger picture’ of training.
  • COMMIT to a choice – OBSERVE the threat, ORIENT to it, DECIDE on the response, and ACT!!!!!
  • We also did a little forensic reenactment of the “Tony Carpet Slide” incident from last class – too funny.

Next week:  Movement vs. Stance.

T.A.W.G. Flagship workout was great!

This gallery contains 5 photos.


Thanks to Tom, Toni, Rick, Sabrina, and Alex for making the flagship workout a great time! Training objectives/outcomes: Highlight “push/pull’ movements (Wedge, Double blades, strikes, 4 count block check counter, De Cadena, Single Hand Shirt grab defense) Learn to consciously … Continue reading